Database Discovery

About Database Discovery

Database discovery was introduced in v16.02.00 (ensure you are running v16.02+), and currently supports Windows-based discovery jobs and servers running the Microsoft SQL Server (aka MSSQL) database platform and also Oracle databases.

Getting started with MS SQL Server DB Discovery (on Windows targets)

Microsoft SQL Server (MSSQL) discovery is supported on discovery targets running Microsoft Windows, and requires a separate set of credentials to authenticate to the database instance itself. Ensure these credentials have appropriate permissions to view the databases you are interested in discovering.

Minimum Permissions Requirements for MSSQL Discovery

For discovery to return detailed info about your database instance, you will require read permissions to the following system views:

  • sys.dm_exec_connections
  • sys.dm_exec_sessions
  • sys.databases
  • sys.tables
  • sys.dm_os_sys_info
  • sys.dm_os_sys_memory

Setting up your MSSQL discovery job

1) To begin discovering your MSSQL Databases [running on Windows], create a new Windows discovery job and be sure to enable database discovery by checking the “Collect database server information” checkbox:

Discover Databases Option for Windows MSSQL
Be sure to fill out both sets of credentials — The first set to authenticate to the Windows Server itself (like you’re used to for regular Windows-based discovery targets), and the second set to authenticate to the Microsoft SQL database itself!

Example job status

2) Kick off your new discovery job to test it (select “Run now” on the Job Screen). As MSSQL databases are detected, discovery will import a list of all instances, databases, and connection details. You can see the status of the discovery job on the job’s setup page, as well – Scroll down to the “Job Status” section and look for the bar graphs.

Viewing MSSQL discovery job results

3) Once the job finishes, you can view the results of your database discovery. There are a couple different ways to see the database details; the most direct is via the discovered MSSQL Application components themselves. Head to the Device42 main menu, Apps menu -> Application Components. If you don’t see your SQL Server instances right at the top of the list, you can search for “SQL” to narrow the list down.

You can see the newly discovered SQL Server instances in the example below — Click any one of the Application Component Names for more details:
MSSQL Application Componenets

Scroll to the bottom, and click the database instance name to view database details:

For a rundown of the database details discovery provides, jump to the “Available SQL database instance information” section.

Another way to view SQL Database details

Results are also available by browsing to the discovered Windows server instance’s CI; either search for the device from the dashboard, via “Devices -> All Devices”, or view your discovery job’s results / score page and jump to the servers from there:

Click any of the “device names” (right hand side) to jump to each discovered machine’s details view. From the details view, you can simply click the “Services” tab to view a list of services, and can then click on the Microsoft SQL Server instance in that list.

Available SQL database instance information

On the “View Database Instance” screen, you will see lists containing the following items:

  • Databases on that instance (each clickable for individual DB connection & size stats)
  • Connections to that DB instance (connection details available for each connection)
  • Database size details, creation date, and path
  • Extra details, including server start time, CPU count, Memory info, and more

A snippet from each section of the page can be seen below:



Getting started with Oracle DB Discovery (on Windows and *nix targets)

Oracle database discovery (introduced in v16.04.00) is supported for Windows an *nix discovery targets, and requires a separate set of credentials to authenticate to the database instance itself. Ensure these credentials have appropriate permissions to view the databases you are interested in discovering.

Minimum Permissions Requirements for Oracle Discovery

For discovery to return detailed info about your database instance, you will require read/view permissions for the following system views/tables:

  • V$SESSION
  • DBA_SEGMENTS
  • DBA_OBJECTS
  • SYS.ALL_USERS
  • DATABASE_COMPATIBLE_LEVEL
  • SYS.PRODUCT_COMPONENT_VERSION

Setting up your Oracle discovery job

1) To begin discovering your Oracle databases, create a new discovery job for Windows or *nix (or both) targets, and be sure to check the Collect database server information checkbox.

Be sure to fill out both sets of credentials – the first set to authenticate to the Windows or *nix server itself, and the second set – Database Username / Password(s) – to authenticate to the Oracle database itself. Save your new job when you’re done.

2) Kick off your new discovery job to test it (select Run Now on the Jobs screen). As Oracle databases are detected, discovery will import a list of all instances, databases, and connection details.

Viewing Oracle DB discovery job results

3) Once the job finishes, you can view the results of your database discovery. There are a couple different ways to see the database details; the most direct is via the discovered Oracle Application components themselves. On the the Device42 main menu, select Apps -> Application Components. If you don’t see your Oracle DB instances right at the top of the list, you can search for Oracle to narrow down the list.

Use the View Database Instances screen to view a list of discovered databases.

Scroll down through the screen to see a list of database connections and sizes.

You can also click on the database name on the View Database Instances screen to see its connection and size data.

On the Application Components screen, click Show to view the database Dependency Chart or an Impact Chart or List.